Wednesday, August 15, 2012

Hunter River, color and infrared


This is one reason I have really started to work with infrared photography for landscapes. Artistically, i love the etherial quality that often comes from infrared capture, especially when combined with a long exposure time. As well, much of my shooting ends up being done in the middle of the day, which is not ideal for landscapes. The files can be a little tricky to work with in some ways, but are much easier in others. Just to show the difference, I have two images of the same scene, one with the IR filter and the other without.


5 comments:

  1. I don't know what I have found more delicious along the way...the food or the scenary photography! What a gift to be invited along on this adventure!Having lunch with an editor for electronic media next week...may I mention your blog?

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    1. By all means, I'm flattered at the thought!

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  2. Ahh, Marion, your comments inspire me to keep doing this. By the way, we should seriously consider PEI for our retirement home.

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  3. Is this a photoshop thing? It's SO COOL!

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    1. Mostly it's a camera thing, actually. I have a special filter that fits in front of the lens and blocks visible light, the part that humans usually rely on to see. Instead, it transmits the infrared part of the spectrum, the light that is "too red" for our eyes to pick up (though some animals can see outside the normal human range). Digital cameras are actually pretty sensitive to IR and the result is something like what you see here: foliage tends to be bright, skies and water dark.

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